Charles Epstein – Money and the Divine Masculine

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Many thanks to the2012scenario.com and Vina for making me aware of this recent article by Charles Epstein, the author of Sacred Economics. Daily, I reflect on how it would feel to be free of money. What would I do? How would I direct my creative impulses? How would my energy flow? What would I let go of? Read on…

I recently attended a ceremony at the Tamera village in Portugal in which the officiant invoked “the healing of money.”

Immediately a vivid image popped into my head of a man, vast and muscular, bound to the earth with stakes and tethers, straining with every atom of his strength to free himself and rise up.

Finally, in a desperate, colossal effort, he bursts free and, standing tall, lets out a triumphant roar before striding purposefully off.

I knew immediately that the man represented the divine masculine and his bonds were made of money.

What is the purpose of men? In some primitive societies they were not of much use at all. In many places women were the center of life, collecting most of the food, looking after young children, and doing the small amount of work necessary to subsist. Subsistence was so easy in many places that, as the anthropologist Marshal Sahlins put it, “half the time the people seem not to know what to do with themselves.” 

Describing the Hadza, he notes one enthnographer’s estimate that adults spend two hours a day on subsistence, the women collecting plant foods “at a leisurely pace and without prolonged labour,” and the men devoting most of their time to gambling. True, the men made an important contribution to the food supply by hunting, but only a small minority of the Hadza did any hunting at all. The rest, it would seem, were completely superfluous as far as the material needs of the tribe are concerned.

In other societies, instead of gambling, the men would devote most of their time to secret societies, ritual activities, interactions with the spirit world, and so on. Theirs was the realm of the abstract; for the most part, the women and children could get along fine without them. Of course, that might change in times of warfare, but that too we might see as another men’s game that bears little benefit to the material welfare of the tribes involved.

read more http://www.realitysandwich.com/money_divine_masculine

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